The Beginnings.

April 2011.
That’s when I was diagnosed with my illness yet it did not fully start then. Since December 2010, I was feeling sick. I constantly had stomach problems, I would wake up in the middle of the night throwing up in my dorm room, I called my parents at 3 a.m. just to pick me up so I can sleep in my own bed and be close to them, and I couldn’t eat. December to April my stomach got larger, I was in and out of the Emergency Room, crying to everyone who was close to me on how my stomach was in pain and I could not handle it. They tried to get me to eat as much as they could and I think I even scared most of my roommates. My parents were worried, no doubt about that but I was so close to finishing my sophomore semester in college that I refused to go to the hospital since I am a hard-headed little brat.

April 11th, 2011
I was rushed to the Emergency Room at 4:00 a.m. because I was vomiting and crying uncontrollably. I was admitted right away but honestly it was such a blur that I do not remember most of what happened until I got into my room. From April 11th – April 14th, I was told that my gallbladder was enlarged and they were giving me medicine to bring the swelling down. The doctors didn’t know why nor did I ask for a certain answer anyway. I hate hospitals. I was scheduled for an MRI on April 14th and my doctor said that since I felt better, I could go home and be an outpatient for the rest of the process, pretty bad idea now that I think about it. Rushed out of the hospital when I did not fully complete the MRI because I’m claustrophobic and I freaked out and ran home into bed. That night, my mother received a call from my doctor saying we shouldn’t have left since I did not complete the MRI and to come back right in the morning for an outpatient process and of course my mother agreed.
Worst.Idea.Ever

April 15th, 2011
I woke up in excruciating pain, wanting to basically rip out my entire stomach and just lay there. My mother rushed me to the pediatric ward of my hospital and while in the waiting room, I was hunched over, crying. Luckily, my doctor stepped out for a patient and saw me in pain and rushed me into the exam room where in 2.5 seconds I was already admitted into the hospital. Once again, I hate hospitals and hearing those words, you’re admitted, is like hearing death… well, I may be being a bit dramatic but all in all, IT’S TRUE DAMNIT!

So let’s start on the horrifying, amazingly nuts this condition turned out to be. Since I did not go through with the MRI, they rushed a cat-scan for my stomach, specifically my liver/gallbladder area. What they came to find out, (which I wish they found out sooner!), is that I had three blood clots in my liver. Three of my arteries were blocked off so water and blood was seeping out into all the little areas of my body so I looked like I was either pregnant or fat. Now, to fix this little situation, they had to put stents, which are little tubes, through the blood clot to open it up. This is what they explained to my parents and me. I would be in surgery for about 5-6 hours and then they would need to keep watch of me for 24 hours because my liver might give out or complications and yes there was complications.
So let’s begin shall we? At least 15 doctors surrounded my parents and I so they could let us know how the surgery would go, of course I wasn’t paying attention because I was too busy crying knowing that I’m screwed up. They put an IV the size of a baby’s arm into my arm and I think it was the first time my father ever heard me curse someone out. I cried to my parents one last time and they rushed me into the Emergency Room.

The next thing I remember was waking up in the ICU with a couple tubes coming out of my neck, oxygen going through my nose and nurses standing next to me saying that my heart rate and blood pressure was dropping so much and they had to watch me carefully. I couldn’t speak, I couldn’t move… I felt faint and dizzy.

This gives you the beginnings. I wasn’t told what I was diagnosed with before the surgery and I had hell of an idea what the surgery was going to do to me after or how my life would alter dramatically.

Once again, thanks for reading ❤
N.Rarity

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N.Rarity

Nina Marie is a 25 year old Bronx native. She has her bachelor's degree in English Literature and she is working on her master's in Early Childhood Education. She has a love of Disney and animals. She was diagnosed with Budd-Chiari Disorder, Myeloproliferative Disease, and a Jakk-2 Mutation at the age of 19. While going through several surgeries and most doctor's appointments, she realized that the best way to get through this hard time was to put it out in the open. Thank You.

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